WINTER 2009
Vol. 39, No. 3
FEATURES
Table of Contents
 
Column: Eye on Isla Vista
By Emily Einolander
  UC Santa Barbara Keeping Focus on Students During Economic Downturn By Rob Kuznia
  Transforming the Alumni Association Web Site into a Gateway By Andrea Huebner '91
  Gear Up for the 2009 All Gaucho Reunion in April
  Alumni Association Awards to Honor Gauchos Giving Back
  UCSB Alumni Association Annual Report 2007-2008
 
DEPARTMENTS
  Editor’s Note:
Defining Success for the New President
  Research Roundup:
Scholar Examines Global Trade of TV Shows
  Around Storke Tower:
News & Notes From the Campus
  Sports Roundup:
’78 and ’79 Cross Country Teams Honored
  Alumni Authors:
Food, Drink and Politics
  Milestones:
’50s to the Present
   
COVER
  Julie Ramos ’03 is one of the voices behind KTYD’s The Morning Show in Santa Barbara.

Cover photo by Alexandria Cooper
 
ADVERTISING RATES
COASTLINES HOME
ALUMNI HOME
AROUND STORKE TOWER
Campus Watches as Obama Takes Office
Internet Links Students at UC Santa Barbara and Jackson State University
Kavli Institute Offers Pioneering Physics to High School Educators
Technology Management Program Partners with One Laptop per Child
UC Santa Barbara Reads Picks ‘Ethics for the New Millennium’
Get Your Taste of Food Matters
Isla Vista Foot Patrol Opens New Station
Library of Congress honors UCSB Digital Library Pioneer
UCSB Community Reaches Out During Tea Fire Crisis
Campus Watches as Obama Takes Office

Members of the UC Santa Barbara campus community gathered Jan. 20 to watch the inauguration of Barack Obama, the first African American president of the United States. Mosher Alumni House’s Alumni Hall overflowed with more than 100 people watching two big screen TVs at an event sponsored by the Center for Black Studies Research. The crowd clapped and shouted as Obama was declared the president at 9 a.m. Pacific time. Televisions were also set up at the UCen in Corwin Pavilion and the Hub for students, staff, faculty and visitors to watch as Obama and Joe Biden took their oaths of office. Faculty and students with 9:30 a.m. classes had to break away just as Obama was finishing his inaugural address. Some students chose to be late rather than miss the end of the speech.
— Coastlines staff

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Internet Links Students at UC Santa Barbara and Jackson State University

A National Science Foundation program allows students in Mississippi to take a UC Santa Barbara materials class that otherwise wouldn’t be available at Jackson State University. The Partnership in Research and Education in Materials program is designed to enhance diversity in materials science through partnerships between minority-serving institutions and NSF-funded material research centers. Professor Guillermo Bazan’s class is one of several collaborative projects involving UC Santa Barbara and Jackson State. The classrooms, which are almost 2,000 miles apart, are connected via an Internet-based webcast, with multiple video screens in each classroom. Bazan sees videoconference classes as a future trend in teaching. “It should be possible to coordinate classes whereby experts in different universities contribute to specific topics,” he said.
— Public Affairs

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Kavli Institute Offers Pioneering Physics to High School Educators

The Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics (KITP) at UC Santa Barbara has awarded $7,000 in cash prizes to six science teachers for their exceptional multimedia classroom presentation on particle physics in the age of the Large Hadron Collider. The teachers’ winning presentations, which include a talk and accompanying discussions suitable for presentation during a single science class period, can be viewed and downloaded at http://www.kitp.ucsb.edu/kitpnews/item/?id=55. The prize recipients were among 78 educators who recently took part in a Kavli Institute program that brings high school teachers to UC Santa Barbara each year to interact with scientists on the most exciting areas of modern physics research.
— Public Affairs
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Technology Management Program Partners with One Laptop per Child

Through a partnership with the One Laptop per Child Project the UC Santa Barbara Technology Management Program provided XO laptops to a Kellogg Elementary School third-grade class. Now, the Goleta, Calif., students can communicate with Kenyan students who are also equipped with the XO laptops. The Kellogg classroom is the first to be a Santa Barbara County regional partner with OLPC. After the laptops were demonstrated for the students, the Technology Management Program presented OLPC founder Nicholas Negroponte with the Leader in Innovation award for groundbreaking steps forward in the field of technology and innovation. The One Laptop per Child project creates educational opportunities by providing laptops to the world’s poorest children.
— Coastlines staff

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UC Santa Barbara Reads Picks ‘Ethics for the New Millennium’

The UC Santa Barbara Library has chosen “Ethics for the New Millennium” by His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama as this year’s book selection for the UCSB Reads program. In his book, the revered spiritual leader and best-selling author presents a moral framework based on universal, rather than religious, principles. UCSB Reads-related activities include films, lectures and art-based events. For a complete list of up- coming UCSB Reads activities, visit https;//ucsbreads.library. ucsb.edu/events.html. Additional programming is available at www.religion.ucsb.edu/dalailama/additionalprogramming. html. The UCSB Bookstore will sell the book at a 20 percent discount.
— Coastlines staff
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Get Your Taste of Food Matters
The Interdisciplinary Humanities Center at UC Santa Barbara is presenting a series of talks, films and events on the theme Food Matters. Topics will include food production, food as a commodity, the global food crisis, and the cultural history of food. Events will include:
TALK: Allen James Grieco (Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies), 4 p.m. Feb. 23 at McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB
TALK: The Triumphs of French Cuisine from Carême to Ratatouille, 5 p.m. Feb. 25 at McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB
TALK: Marion Nestle (Nutrition, Food Studies, NYU), author of “What to Eat,” 7 p.m. Feb. 26 at Marjorie Luke Theater
FILM: Short Orders: A Night of Short Films about the Global Appetite, March 2
FILM: “Dumplings,” April 7
FILM: “The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie,” May 5
TALK: NPR’s The Kitchen Sisters, 4 p.m. May 7 at McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB
TALK: Rebel Without a Cuisine: Julia Child and the Making of the American Cook, 4 p.m. May 13
FILM: “Ratatouille,” June 2
For more information, go to www.ihc.ucsb.edu/foodmatters.html.
— Coastlines staff
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Isla Vista Foot Patrol Opens New Station

The Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Department opened its new Isla Vista Foot Patrol Station in December. The two-story building features 5,300 square feet of workspace along with a 1,400-square-foot covered secure loading area for patrol vehicles. The energy-efficient building will also house members of the UC Santa Barbara Police Department and the CHP who combine to serve Isla Vista and the UC Santa Barbara Campus. Santa Barbara County funded the $4.2 million facility, which rests on UC Santa Barbara land secured through a 40-year lease.
— Coastlines staff
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Library of Congress honors UCSB Digital Library Pioneer

Larry Carver, who recently retired as director of library technologies and digital initiatives at UC Santa Barbara, has been named a Pioneer of Digital Preservation by the Library of Congress. Carver’s work to develop the Alexandria Digital Library allowed geospatial information from the University Library’s Map and Imagery Lab to be searched quickly online. The basic concepts behind the Alexandria Digital Library have been widely adopted by Google Earth, Wikipedia, and others, and were seen on Election Night when almost every television news station and Web news site displayed an interactive U.S. map with real-time voting results.
— Public Affairs
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UCSB Community Reaches Out During Tea Fire Crisis
In the wake of November’s Tea Fire, which caused more than 5,000 people to evacuate, burned nearly 1,940 acres and destroyed more than 200 homes in the Santa Barbara and Montecito area, the UC Santa Barbara community united to show support for victims of the wildfire. Four UC Santa Barbara faculty and staff members were among those who lost their homes in the fire. Outreach efforts included:
  • UCSB’s Hosford Counseling and Psychological Services Clinic offered three free counseling sessions to people whose families were affected by Tea Fire or other Southern California wildfires. The clinic serves as a training site for doctoral students in the Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology.
  • To help those who lost treasured family photographs, Art Professor Richard Ross organized free portrait services for victims of the fire. Photographers Ross, Chris Owen, Mollie Crutcher, Sadie Raber, Calico Brown, and Karen Spektor took family pictures at Ross’s studio.
  • The UC Santa Barbara Athletics Department offered 500 tickets to men's and women's basketball games to victims of the Tea Fire.
  • The University Art Museum opened the Architecture and Design Collection to homeowners whose houses were destroyed or damaged by the blaze. The archive features the collections of three of Santa Barbara's most important architects, George Washington Smith, Lutah Maria Riggs, and Frank D. Robinson, who designed many homes on Mountain Drive, which was especially hard hit by the fire.
  • Members of UC Santa Barbara men’s and women’s basketball teams gave out free tickets for two December games, T-shirts and posters to emergency personnel who worked on the Tea Fire.
  • UC Santa Barbara established a 24- hour emergency assistance line for staff, faculty members, and students who lost or were evacuated from their homes.
  • The campus offered short-term, interest- free loans for UC Santa Barbara faculty and staff to meet immediate needs.
    — Coastlines staff