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Your Best Just Got Better: Work Smarter, Think Bigger, Make More
Jason Womack ’95
Wiley

work smarter

How did you spend your time today? What did you do really well? Were you running behind for every meeting? Feeling stressed? Constantly struggling to maintain your focus? If your performance today was your best, then it's time to make your best better. In “Your Best Just Got Better,” productivity expert Jason Womack shows you that working longer hours doesn't make up for a flawed approach to productivity and performance. Workers need to clarify their habits, build mindset-based strategies, and be proactive. Womack's signature workplace performance techniques offer specific strategies to consistently and incrementally improve perfor-mance. Learn how to maximize your four most limited resources — time, energy, focus, and productivity tools — to build solid and sustainable workflow habits.





How War and Hubris Determined the Rise and Fall of the French Empire
William R. Nester ’87
Savas Beatie Publishing

William R. Nester’s “Napoleon and the Art of Diplomacy: How War and Hubris Determined the Rise and Fall of the French Empire” is the first comprehensive exploration of Napoleon the diplomat and how his abilities in that arena shaped his military campaigns and the rise and fall of the French empire. Napoleon’s official diplomatic career lasted nearly two decades and involved relations with scores of kings, queens, ministers, diplomats, and secret agents across Europe and beyond. All those involved asserted their respective state (and often their private) interests across the entire span of international relations in which conflicts over trade and marriage were often inseparable from war and peace. For Napoleon, war and diplomacy were inseparable and complementary for victory. Much of Napoleon’s military success was built upon a foundation of alliances and treaties.


Lake Tahoe’s West Shore
Carol A. Jensen ’73,’74
Arcadia Publishing

the prehistory of home

First sighted by John C. Fremont and Charles Preuss in 1844, the “Lake of the Sky” beckons to pioneers and adventurers today as it has through history. Author Mark Twain, popular lecturer George Wharton James, industrialist Duane Bliss, and film star Elizabeth Taylor all found inspiration in its secluded sylvan beaches. Washoe tribal members held Dá’o' a ga (“Edge of the Lake”) as their paradise until lumber demands for the Comstock Lode all but stripped the dense forests. Gradually, lakefront property became private retreats and hostelries catering to tourists happily arriving from around the world for winter skiing, summer boating, and holidays.






The Prehistory of Home
Jerry D. Moore ’80
University of California Press

Tahoe's west shore

Many animals build shelters, but only humans build homes. No other species creates such a variety of dwellings. Drawing examples from across the archaeological record and around the world, archaeologist Jerry D. Moore recounts the cultural development of the uniquely human imperative to maintain domestic dwellings. He shows how our houses allow us to physically adapt to the environment and conceptually order the cosmos, and explains how we fabricate dwellings and, in the process, construct our lives. “The Prehistory of Home” points out how houses function as symbols of equality or proclaim the social divides between people, and how they shield us not only from the elements, but increasingly from inchoate fear.





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