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Alumni Authors  Special Edition 2011

The Year Money Grew on Trees
By Aaron Hawkins, ‘96
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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“The Year Money Grew on Trees” by Aaron Hawkins is a children’s adventure novel that tells a highly relatable story of amateur entrepreneurship. When 14-year-old Jackson Jones and a group of his cousins are weighted with the responsibility of turning out $8,000 dollars from an orchard of 300 wild apple trees, the crew must quickly formulate a game plan.

The juvenile group knows next to nothing about farming: pruning, irrigating, and fertilizing might as well be foreign concepts. In a battle against the dirt and freezing temperatures, the crew unexpectedly finds themselves having the time of their lives.

Leaving Art: Writings on Performance, Politics, and Publics, 1974-2007
By Suzanne Lacy, ‘68
Duke University Press

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Art has the power to comment on social issues in a completely different dynamic than other forms of communication.

In her new book “Leaving Art: Writings on Performance, Politics, and Publics, 1974-2007,” Suzanne Lacy combines 30 of her most inspired pieces of writing.

The writings discuss everything from Lacy’s involvement in large-scale, socially engaged art pieces to her questions about high art being inaccessible to the societal intervention. The book also takes a close look at the transformation of feminist art and performance from the ’70s onward.

Against the Wind
By Kat Martin, ‘69
Mira

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“Against the Wind,” is the first book in the trilogy, The Raines of Wind Canyon, by New York Times bestselling author Kat Martin. The tables have turned for Jackson Raines since he was humiliated in high school by his love interest, Sarah Allen. When Sarah returns back to their home town from California after the murder of her husband, she finds herself Jackson’s mercy. She and her daughter Holly are being hunted by ruthless men trying to locate her blackmailing husband’s flash drive which contains reputation-destroying secrets. With only a small amount of money in her pocket, Sarah hides out in Jackson’s cabin. Through suspense and mystery, passions fly between the couple as they rekindle their past while juggling the threats of their present situation.

Inferno
By Todd Riemer, ’06
ToddRiemer.com

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Todd Riemer’s new novel, “Inferno,” uses current global realities to paint a picture of a post-apocalyptic world controlled by a ruthless authoritarian regime.

Blum, the hero, embarks on a quest to murder the Magistrates responsible for the death of his lover Isabelle. In exchange for the opportunity to make the kill, Blum signs a pact with the Midnight Man and offers his own soul as collateral. While battling his way through the Wasteland and Metropolis, Blum realizes that not even his soul can avenge Isabelle’s death.


Learning to Love Math: Teaching Strategies That Change Student Attitudes and Get Results
By Judy Willis, M.Ed ’99
ASCD

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“The Year Money Grew on Trees” by Aaron Hawkins is a children’s adventure novel that tells a highly relatable story of amateur entrepreneurship.

When 14-year-old Jackson Jones and a group of his cousins are weighted with the responsibility of turning out $8,000 dollars from an orchard of 300 wild apple trees, the crew must quickly formulate a game plan. The juvenile group knows next to nothing about farming: pruning, irrigating, and fertilizing might as well be foreign concepts. In a battle against the dirt and freezing temperatures, the crew unexpectedly finds themselves having the time of their lives.

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