An Artist in New York City

Loie Hollowell

Loie Hollowell (41/50)

Type: Alumni
Major: Art

This Alumni Spotlight originally appeared on the College of Creative Studies series "50 for 50". You can read the original here.

CCS is honored to showcase 50 individuals and activities during our 50th Anniversary to share our rich history and amazing people responsible for making our unconventional College possible! Return regularly to learn more. 

Loie Hollowell (CCS Art ’05) is an artist in New York City, a career choice significantly impacted from her time as a student at the College of Creative Studies (CCS). Hollowell heard about CCS through a high school art teacher. When she learned that CCS students had access to their own studios in their first year—unique to CCS when compared with other undergraduate art programs—she knew CCS Art was the program for her.

Hollowell made use of all the resources CCS offers its students, and recommends all current and future CCS students do so as well. She said, “Take advantage of all the resources CCS offers. Work on your work every day. Use the CCS building as a place to hang out. Make stuff while everyone else is out partying.” During her first year, Hollowell utilized the common space in the CCS building for a project. Said the artist: “I was allowed to take over a corner of the common work space in the CCS building and made two dresses with 5-foot-wide hoop skirts.”

This freedom to use the open spaces in the CCS building to work on art is something that stands out to Hollowell as her favorite facet of the College. Thinking back on this, she noted, “Having my own work space and getting to take all kinds of Art classes from performance to multimedia to sculpture in my first few years of undergrad (classes most students don't get to take until they're in their last year) was by far the best aspect of the program.” The non-conformity of the CCS Art program made it a special place where students could explore different avenues of art, and learn to think about art in new and different ways.

The CCS faculty approach to teaching had a profound impact on Hollowell’s career. “I am an artist working in NYC—I live from the sale of my paintings,” said Hollowell. “CCS taught me how to be a self-sustaining creator, how to give myself projects without being told what to do. The program also taught me to think critically about my work. All of this contributed to any artistic success I now enjoy.”

Hollowell looks back fondly on her overall experience at CCS and attributes it to her success as an artist beyond any undergraduate and graduate courses she took. “CCS helped me excel as an artist in the real world which is way more important than doing well by getting good grades,” remembered Hollowell. “CCS gave me the space, resources, and encouragement to make whatever kind of art I wanted to make, free of overly-structured assignments. The faculty, staff, and other students treated me as an artist, not just a student.”